Thursday, July 17, 2014

Too Much Background Noise when Recording Lectures with Smart Phone or Table Built-in Microphone? Check Out the Ampridge MightMic

Mobile devices are convenient tools that students use to record classes and lectures, reporters use to record news conferences, and business people use to record meetings. Some use note taking apps like Notability, Remarks, or Livescribe+ to augment their notes with audio recordings. The benefits of recording the audio can be minimized by poor quality recordings from built-in microphones.

Built-in microphones tend to do a poor job of isolating sounds which results in background noise that makes the desired sounds difficult to hear, especially for people with hearing impairments.

The AmpRidge MightyMic microphone plugs directly into the headphone jack of any smartphone, tablet, or computer that supports microphone input. It proves an alternative audio output jack so users can still plug in headphones while the microphone is plugged in. Its compact size makes it easy to use in class and makes in relatively discrete. The MightyMic microphone works well with an iPhone and is only slightly longer wider than the width of the phone. The microphone  even worked fine with my bulky iPhone case. Once plugged in you can angle the microphone towards the front of the room to capture the most important sounds. In my testing, the MightyMic microphone was on par with the built-in iPhone microphone for close range recording, but worked considerably better than the built-in microphone in a classroom or outdoor long range environment. The MightyMic microphone reduced background noise resulting in better sounding audio playback. If you frequently record classes, lectures, or meetings and are less than satisfied with your device's built-in microphone, the MightyMic mic is a good option to give your sound a boost. If you're looking for a big improvement in sound quality quality you may have to look towards more expensive options.

The Ampridge MightyMic retails for $70 on Also included is a protective carrying pouch and foam protective cover.

Thursday, July 10, 2014

How Apple Could Improve the App Store for VoiceOver Users

Potential  Feature for App Store
Would you buy a song that may or may not play, a car that may or may not fit in your garage, or a remote that could or could not work with your TV? Probably not, but a similar problem is facing VoiceOver users (and users of other built-in accessibility features) every time they look for a new app on the App Store. This user base is growing quickly due to high quality accessibility features that Apple builds into every iOS device. Currently, the App Store offers no way for users to know if the app will be accessible before hitting the buy button. For VoiceOver users, this means throwing away money if the app turns out to be inaccessible. While the issue of app accessibility has been getting a lot of buzz lately, hopefully Apple can implement some solutions to the problem before and until app accessibility is virtually ubiquitous.

One way to help users know if an app is accessible before hitting the buy button is to add an accessibility report to the apps App Store page. Just as App Store pages prominently displays if an app is compatible with Game Center. This report could be generated during Apple's app review process and consist of a simple rating scale to help users determine if the app is accessible for their needs. As Rene Ritchie of suggested, maybe Apple would decide not to recommend any apps that are not fully accessible.

There are other solutions such as allowing developers to create an app accessibility preview alongside the full blown app previews coming with iOS 8. Developers could walk users through how the app interacts with VoiceOver or other accessibility features directly in the App Store using audio and video.

Hopefully Apple and app developers continue to keep in mind when updating their products.